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20130117
20130125
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of power, the transferns of power from the first term administration of president barack obama to his second term administration. the president was officially sworn in by chief justice john roberts yesterday at the blue room at the white house as the first lady and the obama daughters looked on. but in the little less than two hours the president will affirm that oath before a much larger crowd with 100% more pomp and an equal proportion of circumstance. we have a stellar group of guests joining us throughout the day. honestly, to cut to the chase, it is pretty much everybody you know from msnbc. plus, visits with some members of the obama administration, folks from congress, we'll have live reports from the capitol and all along the parade route. and who knows what surprises along the way. it will be a fun day. reverend al sharpton and chris hayes are joining us onset as the day goes along. alongside me are melissa maris perry, ed schultz and the one and only chris matthews. mr. matthews, this is, i think of this as chris christmas. >> i think of the alternative it could be today. jo
of an obama-biden administration? well, a vast majority say, according to the latest fox news opinion poll. what do you think of government spending, is it managed carefully or out of control? right now 83% of you say it's out of control. back in april of 2009, when they were just getting started with the stimulus, 62. so, it's gone up 21% in about the last four years. >> alisyn: i find that wording, also amusing. who thinks the government spending is being managed carefully. 11% is actually the shocking number. >> the shocking word is managed. >> alisyn: and carefully. >> a fire hose of cash. i will say the best thing the president can do for his legacy and starting to talk, i don't think that the president needs a library and now talking he wants a library maybe in chicago. talking about his legacy, most important thing he could do is tax reform and deficit control. if he could put those two things together, that'd be bigger than health care. >> steve: you know what? if he were to work with the republicans talking reform-- >> i think that's a lock for next year. >> steve: well, he wants
the conversation, here are the numbers to call -- host: we're looking at promises made in the obama administration. what counts as a promise kept? what counts as a promise broken? guest: we were inventing a new form of journalism. the beauty of the obameter is you can look things up by subject, by reading. a lot of critics like to focus on the things that we call promises broken. we had to define what was a promise kept and what was a promise broken. how did we define a promise? we defined it promised as a guarantee of prospective action that was verifiable, then we read it typically into one of two ratings. in the work that there was some sort of progress toward fulfilling or stalled if there was a lack of progress. at a point that we felt like we could judge completion, with an decided whether it was kept were broken. kept is pretty much you hear it, the promise has been substantially or completely fulfilled, broken, not fulfilled pretty trickier ones are compromise, to where there has been some progress, where there has been a partial achievement of the goal. ultimately these are judgment calls
also looked at policies and what has been the effort on the part of the obama administration over the last four years to address health care, the economic situation, some of the other issues that are important to the country as a whole. guest: the importance of bringing kids that age and even little ones who did not speak, my mother took me when i was four years old to see senator john f. kennedy come to our home town of louisville, kentucky, and do a campaign rally. we were roman catholics alike and understand when it is important to us as a family or individual, my mother wanted us to be there. she got there early and was in front of the podium to see the senator. when he became president, i know how many full that was for her. politicalbecame a science is probably because of it. -- and i became a political scientist because of it. guest: i have had to do presentations. even though my child won't remember, when he is older, i will show that to him. it is historic to go for the white house and be around the president but certainly, in the history making moment of an african ameri
that in an inaugural address? >> it's a little bit surprising, but given his history, the obama administration's history with the repeal of don't ask, don't tell and also his revolution of gay marriage, it's not that surprising. >> what about you, greg? you were surprised he specifically mentioned stonewall. >> i was surprised that he mentioned stonewall because it's not something you hear when they talk about civil rights, especially from a president, so that really struck me when he said that. >> what do you think it does for gay people not only in this country but around the world? >> i hope it pushes us forward and makes us equal with everyone else, included with everyone else in the country. >> do you feel an additional sense of pride having heard the president mention that today? >> yes, i do. i really do. it makes me feel good to be an american right now and makes me think things will be better in the future. >> thanks pho boto both of you, thanks to the students from kentucky who stood around and waite waited. for you, it was really a speech about better equality? >> i think speeches a
that the obama administration would make sure that future infrastructure investments are more targeted to local areas. in november, last year, the vice president hosted our leadership in the white house to discuss the fiscal cliff and the concerns of mayors regarding both investment programs and tax-exempt financing. whenever there's a major issue that demands attention, again and again and again, vice president joe biden has shown the leadership and courage needed to help move our nation in the right direction. and that is why i was certainly hartened when president obama asked vice president biden to lead a special task force to develop responses to the tragedy not only at sandy hook elementary school, but the daily tragedies we see all across america. the nation's mayors and vice president biden have stood together for many, many years in support of public safety. after all, it was then-senator joe biden who championed the crime bill, which established the cops program and included the ban on assault weapons and large-capacity magazines, which congress unfortunately, allowed to expire. yeste
, the incoming treasure secretary. both parts of the administration. president obama facing a bit of a fight for his next secretary of defense, chuck hagel, on capitol hill. >> the president, with a big smile. same, big, gregarious charm on the platform. >> as you were talking about the clinton foundation, president carter's work, as well, president obama will have to start thinking what he will do in his postpresidency. matthew dowd, talk about president george w. bush. he also has set up a foundation in texas. >> one of the things that immediately happened afterwards, was the decision where the presidential library is. what initiative do you want to be in, postpresidency. and how do you want to conduct yourself in the aftermath of your presidency? and that's a huge part of what goes into the next four years. >> crowd gathering on the mall right there. >> again, we urge all of you to bring your families in to watch because an inauguration speech is not just another speech. i want to go to mark updegrove right now. as you watch, as a historian. mark? >> the inauguration speech is an opportun
economic recovery and economic prosperity in america. they feel president obama is not getting behind this surplus we have. you heard the caller touch upon that when he mentioned what happened, on the moratorium on drilling. it was contested in court and the administration lost that fight. there is a question about how much obama will get behind that. yesterday he talked about climate change and other things. i think the next four years may be tough for energy producers. guest: natural gas has become so plentiful and prices have come down so much that is changing a lot of the economics of the energy industry. that plays right into the question of climate change policy. to the degree that natural gas which is cleaner than coal begins to replace coal as the primary fuel for power plants, that reduces carbon emissions. all of these things are sort of working together. the administration keeps pointing out that oil and gas production is higher than it has ever been and that is true as the economy comes back but there is an inherent tension between some of this energy policy and a job poli
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)